STSMs Abstracts

Gulay Tiryakioglu, Faculty of Languages, France > Esther Breuer, Centre for Writing Competency, University of Cologne, Germany, Mar2019

Christian Tarchi, Università degli Studi di Firenze, Italy > Ruth Villalon, University of Cantabria, Spain, Mar2019

The aim of the STSM was to collaborate with Dr. Ruth Villalón(University of Cantabria) on improving university students’ multiple-documents comprehension and argumentative writing skills. During the STSM, we wrote and submitted an article discussing the influence of thinking dispositions on multiple-texts comprehension in university students. Moreover, we discussed the results of a second study aimed at assessing the efficacy of scaffolding university students’ reading and writing behavior when engaged with controversial topics. Finally, we planned a future intervention study to extend results to the population of secondary school students. This STSM helped us to connect our reading and writing research practices.

Ana Camacho, University of Porto, Portugal > Hilde Van Keer, Ghent University, Belgium, Mar2019

Nina Vandermeulen, University of Antwerp, Belgium > Prof Elena Martín, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Spain, Mar2019

Sandra Borges Tavares, King's College London, UK > Prof Nikolaos Panagiotou, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki Greece, Greece, Mar2019

During this five days STSM visit to Aristotle University of  Thessaloniki(18-22  March  2019),  I  was warmly welcomed by the colleagues from the School of Journalism and Mass Media with the aim of learning and discussing ideas about methods towards the topic of Media Literacy and the Refugee Crisis in EU. More specifically, I had the opportunity to share my research ideas and come back with a better understanding of different methodological approaches that  I will be using in my future research. One important outcome of this visit was a new partnership/collaboration with the school of Journalism and Mass Communications, under the supervision of Prof Nikolaos Panagiotouandwith his colleagues, to conduct research on the Migration and Media Literacy. We also propose a round-table at the next ELN meeting, to discuss the topic and potential findings.

Alma Jahic Jasic, University of Tuzla (Tuzla), Bosnia and Herzegovina > Dr Natalie Schembri, University of Malta, Institute of Linguistics and Language Technology, Malta, Mar2019

Mariona Pascual Peñas, Universitat Auntónoma Barcelona, Spain > Julie Dockrell, UCL Institute of Education, UK, Mar2019

Olga Arias-Gundín, University of León, Spain > Prof Gert Rijlaarsdam, University of Amsterdam, Netherlands, Fev2019

Ana Albuquerque, ISPA - Instituto Universitário (Lisboa), Portugal > Prof Terezinha Nunes, University of Oxford, UK, Fev2019

My Short-Term  Scientific  Mission was carried out in the University of Oxford,  where  I had the opportunity to work with Professor  Terezinha Nunes,  Professor  Peter Bryant and their  Child Development and Learning research group (CDL) at the Department of Education. My proposal was entitled "Literacy interventions: A comparison between English and Portuguese” and its overall purpose was to establish comparisons between interventions developed to promote children’s achievement in literacy in English and Portuguese and to eventually generate models for future intervention research in both languages. My visit lasted for a 1-week period and it was a great experience on multiple levels. I was involved in several meetings of the research group, I was able to access their literacy and numeracy teaching programmes and  I attended some scientific events regarding early years education. Also, I was given the chance to present my own Ph.D. research at one of their seminars, which provided an overview of the work I am enrolled in my home institution. Furthermore, I managed to organize a visit to a nursery and pre-school in London, where I spent a few hours in a naturalistic environment exploring how the educational curriculum is delivered in the Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS). Overall, my STSMwas very productive and enriching, and I feel the aim was fully accomplished.

Maria São Luís Castro, University of Porto, Portugal > Marketa Caravolas, Bangor University, UK, Jan2019

Ariana Loff, University of Luxembourg - ECCS (Esch-sur-Alzette), Luxemburg > Marketa Caravolas, Bangor University, UK, Jan2019

The main goal of this STSM is to expand the scope of the Multilanguage Assessment Battery of Early Literacy (MABEL) adding the Portuguese and the Polish language to it. In this STSM's meetings, we have discussed and agreed upon the adaptations of the MABEL materials and procedures to the Portuguese and Polish languages. We meet Professor Caravolas and the other MABEL members at Bangor University where we analyzed the tests (reading, spelling and phonological processing) items one by one evaluating its fitness to the new languages and discussing the need and the opportunity for changes. We underwent the same process regarding all the tests application procedures. Furthermore, we have discussed future cross-linguistic comparisons for the languages involved (English, Welsh, Spanish, French, Czech, Slovak, Portuguese and Polish) and legal issues regarding the authorship and use of MABEL products. 

Ana Paula Vale, Universidade de Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro, Portugal > Marketa Caravolas, Bangor University, UK, Jan2019

The main goal of this STSM is to expand the scope of the Multilanguage Assessment Battery of Early Literacy (MABEL) adding the Portuguese and the Polish language to it. In this STSM's meetings, we have discussed and agreed upon the adaptations of the MABEL materials and procedures to the Portuguese and Polish languages. We meet Professor Caravolas and the other MABEL members at Bangor University where we analyzed the tests (reading, spelling and phonological processing) items one by one evaluating its fitness to the new languages and discussing the need and the opportunity for changes. We underwent the same process regarding all the tests application procedures. Furthermore, we have discussed future cross-linguistic comparisons for the languages involved (English, Welsh, Spanish, French, Slovak, Check, Portuguese and Polish) and legal issues regarding the authorship and use of MABEL products. 

Marcin Szczerbinski, University College Cork, UK > Marketa Caravolas, Bangor University, UK, Jan2019

Paula Lopez-Gutierrez, University of Leon, Spain > Gert Rijlaarsdam, University of Amsterdam, Netherlands, Jan2019

The main aim of my STSM was to learn how to implement the statistical analyses necessary for the validation of the writing strategies questionnaire  (Kieft, Rijlaarsdam,  & Van den Bergh,  2006; 2008) implemented with upper-primary  Spanish students(from  4th  to  6th  grades).  Therefore,  this STSM took place in Amsterdam  University with ProfRijlaarsdam, who has specific expertise in statistical analysis,  writing research designand specifically in the analysis of the writing strategy questionnaire structure and data. During this STSM, I  can learn the use of and reasons for exploratory  (EFA) and confirmatory (CFA)  factor analysis and how to implement these analyses in  SPSS.  Moreover,  I  can apply this analysis to explore the structure of the writing strategies questionnaire implemented with upper-primary Spanish students. Additionally, I learned how to explore the concurrent validity of the writing strategies questionnaire data with other off-line measures related with planning and revision processes, what gave more statistical power to the study. Finally,  I could discuss future  research directions as well as established a research line between Prof Rijlaarsdamand other researchers in Amsterdam University. In conclusion, I would like to say that this STSM was a great experience that allowed me learnt about very useful statistical methods to validate questionnaires and to set up a cooperative research line.

Liudmila Rychkova, Yanka Kupala State University of Grodno, Belarus > Rui Alves, University of Porto, Portugal, Nov2018

The main aim of the Short Term Scientific Mission at the Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, University of Porto was to master the innovative technology-based cognitive psychology approach to the skill of writing in multiple languages and to acquire new knowledge and techniques elaborated by the writing research group at the University of Porto. To fulfill the tasks necessary for achieving this aim in a one-week period of time, the work to be done was thoroughly planned with professor Rui Alves, who also provided valuable support, advice, consultations, planned meetings at the research laboratories, and gave access to the resources not yet published. Faculty library resources were also at the disposal and appeared extremely useful, especially as some of the literacy series are not still accessible in my country, where scientific publications in Russian prevail in the libraries. Introduction to the technology use (HandSpy platform and LiveScribe smartpens) to explore writing in real time was very important, especially as it can be used for the task of exploring the emotional writing in different languages. I also consider my first visit to Portugal to be the most fruitful one from the cultural perspective, and my acquaintance with the practice of work for a broader community conducted by the University of Porto is certainly worth to share and is important for my home university. I do hope we will collaborate in the frames of ELN and possible future projects.

Eva Lindgren, Umeå University, Sweden > Rui Alves, University of Porto, Portugal, Nov2018

Our edited volume (together with Dr. Esther Brauer, Dr. Elke Van Steendman and Dr. Eva Lindgren) which was an initiative that was enabled by ELN at the meeting in Ljubljana, is in its final stages and the STSM was conducted as a study and collaborative discussion between Eva Lindgren, Rui Alves and Anat Stavans to conceptualize and elaborate the coda of the volume. The study aims to (1) look at all the contributions in the volume entitled Multilingual Literacy and discuss the more general frame in which these contributions showcase the contribution in the light of Multilingual Literacy in Europe; (2) discuss the importance and centrality of this topic, in particular the multilingual issues in Europe in future collaborative projects stemming out of the ELN; and (3) seek for a formalization of an explanatory model of the Multilingual – Literacy Bridge.

Claudia Ioana Doroholschi, West University of Timișoara, Romania > Montserrat Castelló, Ramon Llull University, Spain, Oct2018

The work carried out during the STSM was prepared before the mobility and included meetings with Montserrat Castelló and her research team, working on developing a coding system and on coding qualitative data, discussions regarding best practices in qualitative data analysis and project management, and planning future collaborations.

Andreia Nunes, Universidade do Porto, Portugal > Raquel Fidalgo Redondo, University of León, Spain, Sep2018

As the STSM occurred in the beginning of my Ph.D, the major goal of the proposed STSM was to thoroughly discuss the first study. I attended a team meeting where I presented my project and was able to discuss several aspects of its implementation, not only from regarding the first study, but also regarding the other studies. This discussion gave me important insights to successfully carry out my research work. Additionally, I was able to learn about the projects from other Ph.D students. These discussions and reflections were very helpful to decide some specific details about the design of the studies. Overall, this STSM was an excellent opportunity for me to contact with both junior and senior educational researchers.

Milda Kuraitytė, University of Lisbon, Portugal > Susana Padeliadu, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, Sep2018

The goal of my STSM was to analyze the eye-tracker data collected. Since the eye-tracker collects data in a raw format, Giazitzidou and I started by cleaning the files and working on the variables that were important in order to answer our research questions.

Carolina Cordeiro, Universidade do Porto, Portugal > Thierry Olive, University of Poitiers, France, Sep2018

This STSM occurred after the ending of the data collection and coding from the first study of my PhD. Therefore, this was an asset to the development of my project since it allowed me to discuss the findings from this study with my co-supervisor and with other senior and junior researchers from the Research Center on Cognition and Learning (CeRCA – Centre de Recherche sur la Cognition et l’Apprentissage) from the University of Poitiers. During this visit, I was also able to know more about other projects and techniques used by other PhD students from this university and from other universities that were visiting CeRCA. Although the main part of my STSM was focused on discussing the findings of my first study and on preparing the manuscript with my co-supervisor, I also had the opportunity to present and discuss the assessment protocol and the intervention program that will be used in my second study.

Ruth Villalón, University of Cantabria, Spain > Christian Tarchi, University of Florence, Italy, Jul2018

Thanks to this STSM, Ruth Villalón (University of Cantabria, Spain) visited Christian Tarchi (University of Florence, Italy) from the 9th of July to the 10th of August, 2018. The aim of this mission was twofold. On the one hand, the stay allowed the researchers to start to organize and analyze the data of a study they carried out at the University of Florence on undergraduates’ conflicting sources reading and argumentative essay writing. During these weeks they intensively made progress on the coding and preliminary analysis of the study already underway and planned together further elements of joint endeavour. On the other hand, the second aim was that Ruth Villalon knew the work of the School Psychology Laboratory. Thus, during the STSM she had the opportunity to meet with other professors of the Education and Psychology Department, a seminar on Reading and Writing research was carried out, and she also explored future shared initiatives. Therefore, the STMS goals were fully accomplished and both researchers have set the basis for what, hopefully, will become a fruitful collaboration.

Tomislav Stojanov, Institute of Croatian Language and Linguistics, Croatia > Nicola McLelland, University of Nottingham, UK, Jul2018

The research conducted during my STSM had a major impact on the quality of my H2020 MSCA-IF project proposal. In close collaboration with my MSCA-IF and STSM supervisor, Prof Nicola McLelland, School of Cultures, Languages and Area Studies of the University of Nottingham, UK, I managed to discuss many practical, technical, methodological, and theoretical aspects of the research project. During the stay, I participated in one reading group and two workshops: MSCA-IF Proposal Writing Workshop at the University of Nottingham on 5 July 2018, and Workshop on Linguistic Prejudices on 9-10 July 2018 at the University of Sheffield.

Irune Ibarra, University of Basque Country, Spain > Teresa Limpo, University of Porto, Portugal, Jul2018

From the 22th to the 28th of July 2018, Dr. Irune Ibarra (University of the Basque Country, Spain) visited Dr. Teresa Limpo (University of Porto, Portugal). The STSM was decisive to put the two research communities into contact, by allowing for an in- depth discussion of the works being carried out and how these can be used to develop effective approaches to handwriting teaching, evaluation and intervention. During the STSM there were also fruitful discussions on the next steps for collaborative work to promote handwriting in different languages. Also, Irune Ibarra had some insights to use Handspy software with writers of our community. Additionally, Irune Ibarra gave a lecture on "Handwriting: Important issues through Basque/Spanish materials” and she had the opportunity to learn from the leading researcher Dr. Rui Alves and some personal from the Laboratório de Fala.

Mariona Pascual, Autonomous University of Barcelona, Spain > Rui A. Alves, University of Porto, Portugal, Apr2018

The aim of this STSM was to receive a training in smartpens usage and HandSpy analysis for a data collection in a PhD. thesis about children at-risk of writing difficulties in Catalonia (Spain). Mariona Pascual (Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Spain) visited Rui A. Alves (Universidade do Porto, Portugal) from the 2nd to the 17th of April, 2018. The main goals of the STSM were thus to learn how to use smartpens, to be able to collect text writing data from children at-risk of writing difficulties and a control group of TD children in 3rd and 5th grade of elementary school. Moreover, the usability of the HandSpy software to analyze handwriting, spelling and text-writing abilities was another of the achieved goals. In addition, the grantee was able to present an outline and the main features of her PhD to the research group. With the feedback received on the methodology approach, now she can reshape the investigation to fully give account of the results and the data. All of these goals were fully accomplished and both researchers have set the basis for what will hopefully become a fruitful, long-lasting collaboration.

David Galbraith, University of Southampton, UK > Veerle Baaijen, University of Groningen, the Netherlands, Oct2017

This STSM involved a visit by David Galbraith at the University of Southampton to Veerle Baaijen at the Centre for Language and Cognition University of Groningen from 29 October –3 November 2017. The aims were: (i) to consult with the team at the Centre for Language and Cognition about using Exploratory Structural Equation Modelling (ESEM) to analyse questionnaire data about Writing Beliefs collected from a large sample of Dutch and UK students; (ii) to draft a paper about the findings; and (iii) to prepare bids for funding of collaborative research between the teams at Southampton and Groningen. The main finding from the analysis was that the effect of planning on undergraduate coursework writing performance varied depending on students’ writing beliefs. Specifically, writers with high Transactional Beliefs performed better the less they planned their work; writers with low Transactional Beliefs performed equally well regardless of how much they planned, and performed overall less well than writers with high Transactional Beliefs. This finding supports the findings of a previous  experimental study by Baaijen and Galbraith. Overall, the visit was very productive, and the aims were fully accomplished: a draft of the paper was completed, and two proposals for joint PhD funding were submitted.

Marina Olujić, University of Zagreb, Croatia >>Rui Alexandre Alves, University of Porto, Portugal, Oct2017

I spent two beautiful and fruitful weeks in Porto, from 2ndto 14thOctober 2017, carrying out my workon PhD dissertationwithin the Speech Labon the Faculty of Psychology and Education Sciences, University of Porto in Portugal.First and foremost,I completely and fully devoted my time to deeply focus only on my PhD research with several very helpful and rich discussions with my co-mentor Rui ALexandre Alves. In fact, as the topic of my phD research is interdisciplinary, I am supervised bytwo mentors whose research interests and educational backgrounds are from different fields: associate professor Jelena Kuvac Kraljevic (speech and language pathology; linguistics; University of Zagreb) and assistant professor Rui Alexandre Alves (cognitive psychology; University of Porto).The main aim of my visit to Porto was to be under the direct supervision of my co-mentorRui, who is an expert in research on writing processes, during the process of analysing, interpreting and explaining the obtained data for my dissertation. In addition, this STSM enabled us to discuss and bring out possible explanations for the obtained results and to get some new suggestions for further analyses. Also, we startedto think about potential journals for publishing the obtained data and came to ideas and set some goals for our future collaboration.I have to point out also that I hada valuable and very helpful discussionon statistical analysis with postdoc student Teresa Limpo who helped me a lotinresolving some questions regarding statistical analysis for my PhD data and deciding about the appropriateness of statistical analysis I chose for my data.

Ioannis Dimakos, University of Patras, Greece >> Cerstin Mahlow, University of Bern, Switzerland, Oct 2017

Ioannis Dimakos and Cerstin Mahlow worked together on this STSM at the University of Bern. The purpose of this STSM was to continue the work initiated in an earlier STSM by Cerstin Mahlow at the University of Patras. The focus of both STSMs was the investigation of the production of Multi-Word Expressionsspecifically used in argumentative essays.
We processed and analysed data collected from Greek university students with various levels of typing skills and expertise. We further analyzed data from a 2ndwave of data collection from Greek students in order to verify our earlier results.In addition, Cerstin and Ioannis met with faculty from the Pädagogische Hochschule Bern and promoted the work of the IS1401 COST Action and the European Literacy Network

Nelly Joye, UCL Institute of Education, UK > Lucie Broc, University of Nice, France, Jul2017

During a 9-days stay at the University of Nice, I got the opportunity to gain insight intothe French education system and adapt a survey on multilingualism for French teachers on the SurveyMonkey platform. I also benefitted from this insight when it came to discussing cross-linguistic findings on the spelling performance of children with Developmental Language Disorders(DLD), which were compiled in a meta-analysis. This insight was paramount for the writing of this meta-analytic paper, and will be helpfulfor the discussion of my own thesis results which confront the French and English spelling performance of children with DLD.

Baran Johansson, Umeå University, Sweden > Florence Chenu, University of Lyon, France, Apr17

The STSM imbursement has given me the opportunity to visit our colleagues who work in the same area and use Eye and Pen for their data analyses in Lyon. It was a very fruitful visit. I got the chance to discuss my project with their experts and get feedback that would help me develop my project. Hopefully we will have collaborations in the future projects together.

Teresa Limpo, University of Porto, Portugal > Kausalai (Kay) Wijekumar, Texas A&M University, US, Apr2017

From the 20th to the 29th of April 2017, Teresa Limpo (University of Porto, Portugal) visited Prof. Kay Wijekumar (Texas A&M University, US) as well as Prof. R. Malatesha Joshi, from the same University. The STSM was crucial to put the two research teams into contact, by allowing for an indepth discussion of the works being carried out and how these can be used to develop innovative and effective approaches to writing instruction. During the STSM there were also fruitful discussions on the next steps to strengthen the collaboration between the Porto and Texas teams (e.g., applications for collaborative research funding), both involved in the testing of intervention programs to foster novice writers’ self-regulation skills as well as in the development of technological tools. Additionally, Teresa Limpo gave a lecture on "Examining key ingredients in writing: From transcription to high-level processes” and had the opportunity to attended a one-day Summit on on Meaningful Impact of Learning and Education, organized by Prof. Wijekumar and her team, which counted with the presence of leading researchers from the writing research field.

Trinidad García Fernández, University of Oviedo, Spain > Rui Alexandre Alves, Universidade do Porto, Portugal, Apr2017

The main aim for this STSM was to know how to use Burst and Pauses analysis and its technology (Handspy platform and Livescribe smartpens) for assessment purposes in the context of mathematical word problems. I had carried out my PhD Thesis under this topic, also using process-based measures, but I´m now interested in analysing the potential usefulness of other, more sophisticated techniques, for the same purpose. After my short stay in Porto I consider that the mentioned technology seems a suitable instrument to help identify the cognitive processes and strategies of students while performing mathematical problems with verbal content. Future studies will be designed in order to better determine the usefulness of this technique regarding my field of study.

Catherine Meulemans and Lisa Paesen, University of Antwerp, Belgium > Victoria Johansson, Lund University, Sweden, Feb2017

During the week of the 27th of February until the 3rd of March L. Paesen and C. Meulemans (PhD students of the University of Antwerp) were on a research stay at the Lund University (Sweden). The aim of their stay was to get acquainted with the keystroke logging tool ScriptLog. Since both researchers have experience working with Inputlog, they wanted to explore whether this program could be used in addition to ScriptLog. The STSM revealed that both programs
complement each other. The experiments use picture elicitation. Because the interface of ScriptLog can be easily adapted to experiments with images, they concluded to conduct the experiments with ScriptLog and to analyze the data with both programs.

Bougioukou Maria-Christiana, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece > Julie Dockrell, University College of London, Feb2017

‘‘Short-Term Scientific Missions’’ (STSM) gave me the chance to visit the ‘Language and Literacy Research Centre’ of Institute of Education, UCL in London and be hosted by professor Julie Dockrell. This scholar exchange allowed me to learn new techniques as fas as the construction of an online questionnaire is concerned and specifically I gain a lot of knowledge on surveymonkey, which is a popular online survey software and now I feel quite confident to create an online questionnaire on my own. Moreover, there has been an interesting exchange of views concerning the teaching of writing in primary schools in three languages. Guided by the existing English questionnaire ‘‘Teachers’ reported practices for teaching writing’’ some valuable suggestions for improvement were noted concerning the Greek questionnaire and the Italian one, which are under construction. To conclude, meeting scientists from different countries may seem at first challenging but finally can lead to a wide range of professional experience and multicultural exchange of ideas.

Tatyana Yakhontova, Ivan Franko National University of Lviv, Ukraine > Bojana Petric, Birkbeck, University of London, UK, Dec2016

On November 28-December 7, 2016, Tatyana Yakhontova (Ivan Franko National University of Lviv, Ukraine) visited Birkbeck, University of London. Her host was Dr. Bojana Petric, Department of Applied Linguistics and Communication Studies, a leader of the W2 within the COST Action IS1401ELN. The overall purposes of the STSM included: intensive consultations with Bojana Petric on interviewing in writing research and on developing English writing courses for mature learners; visits to the workshops and seminars, relevant to the purpose of the mission; library work; a presentation on writing issues at the seminar of the Department of Applied Linguistics and Communication studies. These aims were fully accomplished during the STSM, which appeared to be a great opportunity of strengthening collaboration in W2 and furthering the implementation of its research goals.

Esther Breuer, Cologne University, Germany > Marieke Longcamp, Aix-Marseille Université, France , Nov2016

Marieke Longcamp and her colleagues at the Marseille Laboratory of Neuroscience are doing very successful research in the area of brain and language. Among other things, they are interested in visualising the processes that are taking place inside the brain during different phases and in different processes of reading and writing with the help of fMRI and EEG.  
In my own empirical studies, I have found that more than 60% of the errors L2 writers perform in writing are L1 induced. This "interaction” of L1 and L2 becomes nicely visible in L2 texts. Now I want to set up a study in which it is tested whether this influence becomes visible inside the brain when using neurocognitive visualisation techniques. My STSM to Marseille helped me to develop a plan for tests that are realistic in terms of practicability but that are also promising in terms of possible results. I would be happy if colleagues from COST would share their thoughts about the project with mee.

Naymé Salas, Autonomous University of Barcelona, Spain > Teresa Limpo, University of Porto, Portugal, Nov2016

This STSM aimed to discuss methodological and implementation aspects of SRSD interventions to improve opinion essay writing from 2nd to 8th grade in Catalonia (Spain). Naymé Salas (Autonomous University of Barcelona, Spain) visited Teresa Limpo (University of Porto, Portugal) from the 22 to the 26th of November, 2016. The chief goals of the STSM were thus to (1) discuss methodological aspects of the SRSD interventions, particularly treatment fidelity; (2) discuss implementation aspects, such as timing of specific sessions, teacher training recommendations, and pre- and post-test details; and (3) consider the potential for applying to joint research grants and/or joint publications. All of these goals were fully accomplished and both researchers have set the basis for what will hopefully become a fruitful, long-lasting collaboration. 

Helen Limon, Newcastle University, UK > Deborah Soria, IBBY - Italy, Italia, Nov2016

At a dedicated childrens library, during the IBBY-led international volunteer staffed camps, on the small Italian island of Lampedusa, young African migrants are bringing their diverse voices to the IBBY Italy Silent Book collection. These books have been donated by book-loving well-wishers from around the world and have been enjoyed by the island’s children during the series of (now 5) week-long IBBY multi-arts ‘animations’. Now, at a politically charged time in the establishment of the library, the on-going crisis for (primarily) young adult male migrants offers a challenge to use the collection for deep and sustained reflection on what it is to be human. This is done by facilitating story making, a genuine creative exchange, between the island’s permanent and temporary residents beyond the physical walls of the island’s new library.
Collaborative story making is a small but, I argue, very significant experience of creative mutuality that offers the possibility for new communal spaces to open up and for multi-layered, multi-aged communities of practice to be nurtured. Collaborative story making speaks to the construction of literacy in its widest sense by including the book and the empathetic potential of stories at a very early stage in the ‘reading’ journey. It also recognises that the story is a particular form of writing and reading with its own ‘rules’ and cultural resonances. By using the silent books a library ‘space’ is made on the streets of the town, where what is shared can be experienced as greater than that which is not shared. This is the basis of empathetic knowledge and so a foundational element in sustainable community building

Tomislav Stojanov, Institute of Croatian Language and Linguistics, Croatia > Roman Schneider, Institute for German Language, Germany, Oct2016

I visited the Institute for German Language (Institut für German Language) in Mannheim, Germany from October 10th until October 28th 2016. My aim was to investigate the relationship between multilingual orthographic literacy and competences in a digital world, so I have joined the Orthographic Resource Group at the Grammar Department.
I have explored the recent German language orthographic reform and its connection with the literacy development and education. Since the Institute is one of the leading centres in corpus linguistics in Europe, I have analysed the technological aspects in corpus collection and processing for orthography research purposes. Moreover, I have studied whether modern digital literacy trends has influenced the orthographic manual for German and in what extent.
This Short-Term Scientific Mission helped me to establish several important contacts for my future career prospects. The research is part of my postdoctoral sociolinguistic study on orthographic theory, practice and technology in European languages.

Anat Stavans, Beit Berl College, Israel > Rui Alves, University of Porto, Portugal, Sep2016

The HandSpy software developed for the analysis of writing using smartpens has been developed by a team led by Prof. Alves at the University of Porto. During the STSM we applied this software to analyse over 250 productions of children’s writing in Hebrew. The scripts and languages for which the software has been developed diverge radically from that of Hebrew. Our challenge was to observe in what way the software can be applied to different alphabets and languages. Insights and recommendations will be lined to expand and continue our collaboration. The analysis of the suitability and loops in the software has shed light on further improvement of the software to be used in cross-linguistic and cross-orthographic notations.

Ana Camacho, University of Porto, Portugal > Reda Gedutiene, Klaipeda University, Lithuania, Apr2016

My short-term scientific mission was carried in Klaipeda University in Lithuania, from 17th to 24th of April 2016. Prof. Reda Gedutiene and I engaged in many productive scientific discussions about reading and writing disabilities. Reda Gedutiene is committed to advancing dyslexia research and its clinical assessment. Therefore, we discussed many interesting themes, such as a book on dyslexia she has just accomplished, Lithuanian and Portuguese writing systems, and the differences between the two country school systems. Clinical assessment of reading and writing disabilities is a main research line of Reda Gedutiene. Thus, we talked about a battery she has developed with Polish colleagues, and we also discussed two assessment tools developed by our research group – the Phonological Battery of Porto University and the software Handspy. Together we thought about future joint studies using these tools. Home literacy environment is other research line that interests both Reda Gedutiene and our team, so we discussed studies we have recently conducted. We deeply discussed a study Reda Gedutiene conducted about emergent literacy components
and family factors during the transition from preschool to school in Lithuania. This study highlighted the impact of family factors on Lithuanian children’s reading performance, which led us to discuss a study carried by our group. In this study, we developed and implemented an intervention program to analyse the impact of parental involvement in writing performance and motivation of second graders. These insightful discussions were very fruitful to develop my PhD project. Besides her work in the university and in the clinical setting, Reda Gedutiene also participates in several community events to spread knowledge about dyslexia and literacy. This interested me a lot, because Porto’s group is also very engaged in building bridges between scientific community and practitioners. This visit was also worthwhile from a personal and cultural perspective since I had the opportunity to know Lithuania history, culture and socio-political context. Although my stay in Klaipeda was only one week long, I consider that this STSM renewed my motivation for conducting literacy research, and its effects will be long lasting. For all this, I thank Prof. Reda Gedutiene for providing me an invaluable STSM.

Cerstin Mahlow, Institut für Deutsche Sprache, Mannheim > Ioannis Dimakos, University of Patras, Greece, Apr2016

Marije Michel, Lancaster University, UK > Marielle Leijten, University of Antwerp , Belgium, Mar2016

During a fruitful STSM visit of Dr Marije Michel (Lancaster University) to the University of Antwerp (host: Dr Marielle Leijten) we explored possibilities to build upon each other’s expertise on key stroke logging and eye tracking in online environments (e.g., during written synchronous computer mediated communication, SCMC). First, Michel participated in the ‘COST European Literacy Network Training School on Writing Process Research: Keystroke Logging’ that took place from 16th to 18th March 2016 at the University of Antwerp, Belgium. Michel received important insights into the strengths and constraints of existing tools (e.g., powerful analyses of Inputlog in MS Word, www.inputlog.net). During follow-up meetings with members of the host university the development of future software applications was discussed, such as, the integration of Inputlog analyses into the tool EyeAnt currently being developed by Michel and Anthony (www.laurenceanthony.net) that records eye movements in online environments. Furthermore, a future collaboration between Leijten, van Waes and Michel aims at collecting baseline data of English native speakers at Lancaster University for a copy task that establishes individual typing skills. This copy task is integrated into the newest version of Inputlog.

Rut Sánchez-Rivero, University of Leon, Spain > Rui Alves, University of Porto, Portugal, Mar2016

I started my STSM meeting Prof. Rui A. Alves. We mutually introduced and shared ideas and agreed on the working plan to be carried during my STSM. Then, I get acquainted with the Porto Writing Group, their members and facilities.  Since the main goal of my STSM was to achieve high skills in managing HandSpy software, I started using it on the second day and continued practising and improving my skill in it over the rest of the week.  On the third day, I had several meetings focused on sharing the many research studies being developed by the members of the writing group and other researchers belonging to the cognitive and language lab. Therefore I had the opportunity to discuss with them my planned PhD studies and pick up suggestions for improvements.  Finally, on the last two days I had meetings with Teresa Limpo and Rui Alves. I could learn from Teresa how to develop effective interventions in spelling and handwriting in order to improve children`s writing. Moreover, I also observed an implementation of the triple-task technique in writing and get acquainted with. Finally, in the last day I had personal tutoring with Prof. Rui, in which we discussed in depth how to plan and develop my PhD studies and discussed some changes so to improve the fidelity and validity of my future intervention studies. Overall, this was an excellent training in HandSpy usage and a thoughtful occasion for rich indepth discussions of my planned PhD studies.  

Rannveig Oddsdóttir, University of Iceland, Iceland > Per Henning Uppstad, University of Stavanger, Norway, Mar2016

From the 23th February to 15th march 2016 I had the opportunity to have a Short Term Scientific Mission at the University of Stavanger and stay at the Norwegian Reading Centre which is located within the University. The three principal aims of the proposed STSM were: a) to create an opportunity to present and discuss my research on young Icelandic children´s text writing with the Literacy and Learning team at the Reading Centre in Stavanger; b) to learn about Norwegian literacy research, and c) to establish collaboration in literacy research within the Nordic countries.
 The mission in Stavanger was of great value to me and fulfilled my aims. I got opportunities to meet people in my field to discuss my research and got some input from them for my data analysis and writing. I also had good time to concentrate on my thesis which was essential for me because I am in the final stage of my doctoral studies, planning to finish within one year. I listened to several lectures at the University of Stavanger and enjoyed a Norwegian conference on reading which gave me good insight into Norwegian literacy research and schooling. By staying at the Reading Centre I got in contact with other specialist in this field which might be the first steps towards further collaboration in literacy research between Iceland and Norway.

María Arrimada, University of León, Spain > Per Henning Uppstad, University of Stavanger, Norway, Feb2016

This STSM took place at the Reading Centre at University of Stavanger (Norway) with Dr. Per Henning Uppstad and Dr. Mark Torrance, who was there at the same time as me. It mainly served to redesign both my current study and my whole thesis in order to plan a more realistic approach. Specifically, it focused on linking the approaches followed by the experts at the Reading Centre to my own piece of research, so that I could find ways to help struggling writers. From my point of view, this general aim was highly achieved, as I had the opportunity to meet different experts who gave me a bunch of valuable ideas. The main part of my work in Stavanger focused on discussing my project and collecting hints about how to carry it out. This included general ideas I got from conferences, as well as more specific ones I got from personal talks. In addition to acquire a clearer idea about how to develop my project, I was also able to gain some valuable input on process data analysis and statistical methods to segment written words in meaningful units. Moreover, comparing my own study with the On Track project followed by the Norwegian team provided me with interesting information about which reading measures also predict writing performance. Finally, I was able to discuss future research lines with the experts at the centre, as well as a possible collaboration between Universities of Stavanger, Nottingham and León. In general, this STSM proved to be incredibly valuable to develop my thesis, as it allowed me to share my ideas with people from many different countries. I think this will probably end up in great scientific contributions. For this reason, I encourage all students to take part in a STSM if they have the opportunity. I’m sure they’ll find it pleasant and really fruitful, exactly as I have found mine.

Nelly Joye, University College of London, UK > Thierry Olive, University of Poitiers, France, Feb2016

Nelly Joye visited Thierry Olive and Lucie Broc (CeRCA, University of Poitiers, FR) from the 31st of January to the 9th of February 2016. The aim of this Short-Term Scientific Mission was to pursue an on-going systematic review of the literature on spelling. This systematic review focuses on both typically-developing children and children with a language impairment across European languages.

Irma Brkovic, University of Zagreb, Croatia > Tomas Tjus, University of Gothenburg, Sweden, Jan2016

Dr. Irma Brkovic from University of Zagreb, Croatia, has visited host institution Department of psychology, University of Gothenburg, Sweden, with the aim to strength research and intervention framework for supporting reading and writing skills development in children from Nordic and Slavic languages. In the period described, she and her colleagues from Sweden and Croatia have organized, prepared and analyzed comparison data on Swedish and Croatian children that participated in intervention study that utilized computer program Omega-IS, originally developed by Swedish research team. They prepared methodological sections and analyses for two  collaborative papers, as well as collaboration presentation at AMBLE 4th Symposium: Reading, Mathematics and Developing Brain, organized by Amble-project research group which encompass representatives from the disciplines of pedagogy, mathematics education, neuroscience and psychology.

Mónica Moreira, University of Porto, Portugal > Karin Landerl, University of Graz, Austria, Dec2015

During my visit to Dr. Landerl team, at the University of Graz, I was able to collect important resources to my master’s thesis and deepen my knowledge of the study and evaluation of learning disabilities. I had opportunity to collect resources non-existent at Portugal at the moment, and assist several sessions of learning disabilities using a multimethod approach include EEG, fMRI, Eye Tracking, and the Intuos pen and Wacom tablet.

Yvonne Knospe, University of Antwerp, Belgium > Kirk P.H. Sullivan, Umeå University, Sweden, Nov2015

The STSM's goal was to improve the on-going co-tutelle between Umeå University and the University of Antwerp for my PhD thesis. I am currently working on the analysis of my data with the help of researchers at the University of Antwerp. During my visit at Umeå University I presented the results obtained so far and received constructive feedback and ideas on how to continue the analysis for the remaining three months in Antwerp. Further I could meet and discuss my work with a number of colleagues within my research field, which will be helpful in order to finish my PhD thesis.

Irma Brkovic, University of Zagreb, Croatia > Thomas Tjus, University of Gothenburg, Sweden, Nov2015

Dr. Irma Brkovic from University of Zagreb, Croatia, has visited host institution Department of psychology, University of Gothenburg, Sweden, with the aim to strength research and intervention framework for supporting reading and writing skills development in children from Nordic and Slavic languages. In the period described, she and her colleagues from Sweden and Croatia have organized, prepared and preliminary analyzed comparison data on Swedish and Croatian children that participated in intervention study that utilized computer program Omega-IS, originally developed by Swedish research team. They prepared methodological section of collaborative paper, and organized and received funding for project and collaboration continuation. Dr. Irma Brkovic has also attended meetings of Amble-project research group which encompass representatives from the disciplines of pedagogy, mathematics education, neuroscience and psychology.

Maria Arrimada Garcia, University of Leon, Spain > Mark Torrance, Nottingham Trent University, UK, Oct2015

This STSM took place at the Reading Centre at University of Stavanger (Norway) with Dr. Per Henning Uppstad and Dr. Mark Torrance, who was there at the same time as me. It mainly served to redesign both my current study and my whole thesis in order to plan a more realistic approach. Specifically, it focused on linking the approaches followed by the experts at the Reading Centre to my own piece of research, so that I could find ways to help struggling writers. From my point of view, this general aim was highly achieved, as I had the opportunity to meet different experts who gave me a bunch of valuable ideas. The main part of my work in Stavanger focused on discussing my project and collecting hints about how to carry it out. This included general ideas I got from conferences, as well as more specific ones I got from personal talks. In addition to acquire a clearer idea about how to develop my project, I was also able to gain some valuable input on process data analysis and statistical methods to segment written words in meaningful units. Moreover, comparing my own study with the On Track project followed by the Norwegian team provided me with interesting information about which reading measures also predict writing performance. Finally, I was able to discuss future research lines with the experts at the centre, as well as a possible collaboration between Universities of Stavanger, Nottingham and León. In general, this STSM proved to be incredibly valuable to develop my thesis, as it allowed me to share my ideas with people from many different countries. I think this will probably end up in great scientific contributions. For this reason, I encourage all students to take part in a STSM if they have the opportunity. I’m sure they’ll find it pleasant and really fruitful, exactly as I have found mine.

Lucie Broc, University of Poitiers, France > Julie Dockrell, University College London, UK, Oct2015

Lucie Broc visited Julie Dockrell and her doctoral student Nelly Joye (UCL Institute of Education, London) from the 23rd of October to the 1st of November 2015. The aim of this short term scientific mission was to establish the basis of a systematic review of the research evidence which has been published on spelling developmentfor language-impaired and typically-developping children across European languages.

Paula Lopez Gutierrez, University of Leon, Spain > Mark Torrance, Nottingham Trent University, UK, Oct2015

The main aim of my STSM was to discuss the results of an empirical study based on the analysis of the effectiveness of the strategy-focused instruction which comprises both textual product and writing process data. Therefore, this STSM took place in Nottingham Trent University with Dr. Torrance, who has specific expertise in statistical analysis, writing research design, and in manipulating and coding process data. Specifically, during this STSM I can learning the uses of and reasons for multilevel statistical methods, based in mixed effects regression (MER) models, and how to work and implement these analyses in R. Moreover, I can apply this new method to my own data in relation with the product and process data, what gave more statistical power than my previous analyses.  On the other hand, I also could discuss future research directions as well as established a research line between Dr. Torrance and my colleagues from Norway and Spain, who were enjoying the STSM at the same time than me. In conclusion, I would like to say that this STSM was a great experience that allowed me learnt about very useful statistical methods as well as to know other research approaches to develop my thesis and to set up a cooperative research line into different countries.

Teresa Limpo, University of Porto, Portugal > Vince Connelly, Oxford Brookes University, UK, Oct2015

From the 12th to the 20th of October 2015,Teresa Limpo (University of Porto, Portugal) visited  Prof. Vince Connelly (Oxford Brookes University, UK). The overall purpose of the STSM was to discuss the research activities being carried out in the postdoc of Teresa Limpo, which examines the contribution of handwriting, sentence construction, and planning skills to writing performance in developing writers. The visit was specifically aimed to discuss the results of a first study examining the mechanisms through which handwriting fluency contributes to writing quality and to plan a second study testing the added  value of combining handwriting and sentence construction instruction. These aims were fully accomplished during the STSM, which was a great opportunity to strengthen the scientific collaboration between our research teams.

Vibeke Rønneberg, University of Bergen, Norway > Mark Torrance, Nottingham Trent University, UK, Oct2015

This STSM forms part of a project aimed at developing understanding of the micro detail of writing time course and how this relates to spelling and composition-writing performance. This work is based on detailed analysis and statistical modelling of both keystroke and digitally-capture pen data. The STSM comprised a week-long seminar / tutorial involving Mark Torrance (Nottingham Trent University), Paula Lopez Guitierrez and Maria Arrimada Garcia (University of León), and myself. Our main focus was (a) on developing and understanding of each other’s research, (b) exploring markup of digitized pen data, and (c) using advanced statistical methods, implemented in R, to analyses multilevel process and product data, and (d) developing plans for future three-way collaboration between research groups in The Norwegian National Reading Centre (University of Stavanger), University of León, and Nottingham Trent University.

Émilie Ailhaud, CNRS, France > Victoria, Lund University, Sweden, Oct2015

 I visited Victoria Johansson (Centre for languages and literature, Lund, Sweden) from the 1st to the 07th of October, 2015. My research work concerns on-line processes involved in writing. So far my research investigates handwriting only, but my perspective for future research is to conduct similar analyses on typed texts. Thus, the main aim of this STSM was to learn how to use Scriptlog, which is a keystroke logging program developed in Lund. I conducted some tests to record data with this logging program, and we had very interesting discussions about the difference between handwriting and typing. I also had the opportunity to discover tools used in the Humanities Lab of Lund, such as their eye-tracker, used in order to explore reading during writing. Lastly, we had many fruitful exchanges about the development of linguistic skills from adolescence until expertise, as we work on this common topic but with some methodological differences. The particular expertise of Dr. Victoria Johansson in many domains I am interested in (linguistic development, on-line studies to investigate writing processes) and the complementarity of our methodological approaches allows a very fruitful collaboration, strengthened by this STSM.

Maria João Couto, University of Vigo, Spain > Karl‐Heinz Pogner, Copenhagen Business School, Denmark, Sep2015

I was kindly received by Karl-Heinz Pogner at the Department of Intercultural Communication and Management of Copenhagen Business School. The general goal of my STSM was to analyze academic writing process and the use of digital interactive tools in the supervisory process in an international context. Concerning specific research objectives, it was possible to understand teachers’, students’ and coordinators’ perspectives on Master’s thesis writing process. With this mission I could understand and detect strengths, weaknesses, potential and obstacles in academic writing supervision. Results suggest the importance of pedagogical strategies based on the promotion of educational innovation and the use of digital and interactive resources. Acknowledgement: I am truly grateful for the opportunity that allowed me to advance my research in the literacy field.

Emilio Gallardo-Saborido, University of Seville, Spain > Anastasi Prodani, University of Tirana, Albania, Aug2015

Emilio J. Gallardo-Saborido (University of Seville, Spain) visited Professor Anastasi Prodani (University of Tirana) from 23rd to 29th of August 2015 in order to develop the project entitled "Academic writing in Spanish and Albanese: a contrastive experience”. The specific goals of this research are: a) developing a database of pieces of academic writing in Albanian and Spanish; b) creating rubrics to analyse and synthesize the main features of academic writing in both languages; c) using the collected data to study the influence of the Albanian notion of good writing in students of Spanish as a foreign language. During this visit, we developed the whole design of the project and we produced the first research tools (survey no. 1 and instructions for students to produce their texts) that we will use to collect the first data during the academic year 2015/2016.

Marta Łockiewicz, University of Gdansk, Poland > Marketa Caravolas, Bangor University, UK, Jul2015

I visited Dr. Marketa Caravolas (the Bangor Literacy Lab (BLL), School of Psychology, Bangor University, Wales, UK). During the STSM I collected materials about literacy (theoretical approaches, assessment, etc.) unavailable in Poland. I learnt about the methodology of research at Bangor, including  software assisting in the linguistic data analyses, which will allow me to expand the analyses of Polish students with dyslexia difficulties in learning English as L2, which I have been currently conducting. I visited the Miles Dyslexia Centre and a primary school, where I learned about the educational practices for second language learners in the UK. Dr. Caravolas and I have discussed a proposal for a research collaboration towards conducting a joint study on vocabulary development and lexical processing skills in children learning second languages (e.g., Polish-English, Welsh-English, etc.).

Esther Breuer, Cologne University, Germany > Gert Rijlaarsdam, University of Antwerp, Belgium, Feb2015

Gert Rijlaarsdam and colleagues initiated a project has the goal of improving pre-university students’ performance in academic synthesis tasks with Level up Instructions & Feedback Tool. The colleagues make a base-line study on the writing performances (text as well as process analysis) of pupils in the final years and BA students at the beginning. They are in the process of creating a picture of these aspects for the whole of the Netherlands as well as Belgium. They will use these data in order to start an intervention study which will investigate whether giving feedback on relationship between the writing processes and the text quality or whether a text centred feedback is more effective in enhancing the pupils’/students’ writing performance. Since this project is very promising for Germany (and probably for most other countries in Europe), in this short term scientific mission, Esther Breuer visited Gert Rijlaarsdam and his colleagues in Antwerp, in order to learn more about LIFT (e.g., the steps taken, the material to be developed, etc.), and to discuss how LIFT could be adjusted to the German context. The cooperation during the mission was very productive, and Esther is looking forward to taking the first steps soon.























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